Red Cabbage pakoda ( with Amaranth flour )

I always knew that government officials are a tardy lot who take forever to move files and cannot be budged into action without the lubricating effect of a few crisp currency notes (aka bribes). But copying or plagiarizing from blogs ?? Incredulous !! I find it tough to believe this. Even more than the fact that there are others who have turned blogging into a social media circus.

Honestly this is a creative thing and the biggest appreciation comes when someone reads our stuff and complements us . But can I possibly accept compliments for a borrowed piece of work ? Bullshit !! Other than garnering a few likes and a complement or two, it does nothing good for a blogger. And surely it does not earn you some great 'fans' or friends as I like to call them. Thank you Nidhi dear for pointing it out to me.

Anyways getting back to all things good, I actually tried this out during the Navratri days but could not get it published in time. Since I had given up onion and garlic for a few days, I had tried this yummy snack one afternoon. As part of my 'desi'-fication drive, I adopted yet another foreign vegetable and tried to give it an Indian twist.

Read on for the recipe -


















Preparation Time - 20 mins

Ingredients -

  • 2 cups shredded red cabbage
  • 2-3 tbsp amaranth flour (rajgire ka atta / Farari flour)
  • 1 tsp cornflour
  • 1/2 tsp red chili powder
  • 1/4 tsp coriander powder
  • 2 pinch roasted cumin-chili powder
  • a pinch of garam masala
  • a pinch of turmeric
  • salt to taste
  • 2 tsp chopped cilantro
  • very little water to loosely bind the ingredients


Preparation - Take all the ingredients in a mixing bowl. Add a little water and bind it lightly.

Cooking - Heat oil in a wok. Add a small amount of the mixture and fry it for a few mins. Remove and keep aside on paper towels to absorb excess oil.

Repeat with the remaining mixture.

Serve hot !!


















Note - This is inspired by a loose kind of onion pakoda that I sometimes prepare. But one can chop the cabbage into still finer bits and add more binding to get the regular kind of pakoda. 

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